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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 289-294

The relationship between self-compassion and the experience of memorial symptoms in patients with gastrointestinal cancer


1 Department of Adult Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Elaheh Ashouri
Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijnmr.IJNMR_284_20

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Background: Patients with Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer experience a range of physical and psychological memorial symptoms after developing cancer and beginning to receive medical care. The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between self-compassion and the experience of memorial symptoms in patients with GI cancer. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-correlational study was conducted in July to August 2019. The study sample included 190 patients admitted to Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital, with GI cancer who entered the study by convenience sampling. Data were collected using a patient demographic information form, Neff's Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), and the Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale (MSAS) and then analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient in SPSS-20. Results: The mean (SD) total score of self-compassion was 86.67 (16.65) out of 130, and the mean (SD) total score of memorial symptoms was 1.40 (0.64) out of 4 in patients with GI cancer. The most frequently reported physical symptom was lack of energy, with an 86.84% prevalence, and the most frequently reported psychological symptoms included worrying and feeling nervous, with 70.52% prevalence rates. The total score of self-compassion was inversely correlated with the total score of memorial symptoms, the score of psychological symptoms, and the score of physical symptoms. Furthermore, the total score of the memorial symptoms was inversely correlated with the scores of all the self-compassion components (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Cancer patients had memorial symptoms in both physical and psychological domains. These symptoms decrease with an increase in self-compassion, so compassion-based educational interventions by nurses can be used to reduce these symptoms.


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