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   Table of Contents      
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 81

The unsolved psychological consequences of earthquake aftershocks in Kermanshah City, November 2017


1 Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
2 Lifestyle Modification Research Center, Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
3 Clinical Research Development Center, Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

Date of Web Publication7-Dec-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saeid Komasi
Clinical Research Development Center, Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijnmr.IJNMR_45_18

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How to cite this article:
Heydarpour B, Soroush A, Saeidi M, Komasi S. The unsolved psychological consequences of earthquake aftershocks in Kermanshah City, November 2017. Iranian J Nursing Midwifery Res 2019;24:81

How to cite this URL:
Heydarpour B, Soroush A, Saeidi M, Komasi S. The unsolved psychological consequences of earthquake aftershocks in Kermanshah City, November 2017. Iranian J Nursing Midwifery Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Jan 21];24:81. Available from: http://www.ijnmrjournal.net/text.asp?2019/24/1/81/247050



Dear Editor,

Natural disasters such as storms, floods, and earthquakes are inevitable events that sometimes create acute problems in countries across the globe.[1] On November 12, a terrible earthquake, measuring 7.3 on the Richter scale, occurred near Kermanshah center causing significant financial losses and casualties. In nearby cities, such as Kermanshah, with a population of 1.5 million, people were overwhelmingly worried. A more serious problem was the frequent aftershocks that caused the people's fears to be fixed after that the major event. This forced them to be constantly on the streets and be disturbed regarding academic, occupational, and social life. The repetition of aftershocks resulted in the process of people's grief be more complicated and remain unresolved.[2]

Grief is defined as being away from the state of health and well-being. According to Kubler-Ross, the process of grief involves five stages: shock and denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.[3] When a fatal event occurs only once, the process of grief and mourning follows the normal procedure of solution. In case of repetition of disaster, the process of solving the problem is not natural. Repeated aftershocks during the first month after the event result in people constantly caught in the first three stages of Kubler-Ross model. Because of the inability to anticipate future aftershocks, people were involved in anticipatory grief, that is, the occurrence of a reaction before inevitable loss.[4]

As Kermanshah city was not the focus of the earthquake and devastation, the mental problems of the people were not considered by any organization. In such a situation, intervention in crisis should be focused on ensuring people's mental security. Helping to solve anticipatory grief, providing appropriate solutions to increase safety from future earthquakes, teaching emotional control methods, and emphasizing support-oriented treatment methods by psychologists may possibly be effective in controlling the psychological consequences of similar events in future.[5] Therefore, we recommend that if such events are repeated in the country, specialized psychological interventions[5] and social work services[1] should be designed based on the types of grief. Such interventions may be more effective in restoring psychosocial security to the public.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

Nothing to declare.



 
  References Top

1.
Javadian R. Social work responses to earthquake disasters: A social work intervention in Bam, Iran. Int Soc Work 2007;50:334-46.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Hu XL, Li XL, Dou XM, Li R. Factors related to complicated grief among bereaved individuals after the Wenchuan earthquake in China. Chinese Med J 2015;128:1438-43.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kübler-Ross E, Kessler D. On grief and grieving: Finding the meaning of grief through the five stages of loss. Scribner. Retrieved. 2007–via Amazon.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Garand L, Lingler JH, Deardorf KE, DeKosky ST, Schulz R, Reynolds CF, et al. Anticipatory grief in new family caregivers of persons with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 2012;26:159-65.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Ekanayake S, Prince M, Sumathipala A, Siribaddana S, Morgan C. We lost all we had in a second: Coping with grief and loss after a natural disaster. World Psychiatry 2013;12:69-75.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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