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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 570-576

Investigation of the effect of religious doctrines on religious knowledge and attitude and postpartum blues in primiparous women


1 Department of Midwifery, Maternal - Fetal Medicine Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Department of Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz, Iran
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fellowship of Infertility, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
5 Department of Biostatistics, Infertility Research Centre, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Marzieh Akbarzadeh
Department of Midwifery, Community-based Psychiatric Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Namazi Squear, Shiraz
Iran
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Source of Support: The study was financially supported by the Research Vice-chancellor of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-9066.164586

Clinical trial registration IRCT 2013071714041N1

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Background: Postpartum blues is a transient change of moods occurring in the first few days after delivery. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of religious doctrines on postpartum blues in primiparous women. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled tria1, 84 primiparous women who had average or weak religious attitude were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. In the intervention group, religious doctrines were instructed from 20 th to 28 th weeks of gestation through 6 weekly sessions of 60-90 min each. The control group, however, just received the routine care. Spielberger's anxiety scale and the questionnaires assessing religious knowledge and attitude were completed by both groups before, immediately after, and 1-2 months after the intervention. Also, postpartum blues were evaluated by Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) 10 days after delivery. Then, the data were analyzed using Chi-square, paired t-test, independent t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed postpartum blues in 59.5% of the study participants. Besides, the results of independent t-test revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the mean score of postpartum blues (P = 0.036). Although the intervention group's knowledge and attitude scores were higher than those of the control group, no significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the correlation coefficient between postpartum blues and religious knowledge (P = 0.088) and religious attitude (P = 0.7). Conclusions: The results of the study show that instruction of religious doctrines was effective in increasing the religious knowledge and attitudes and reducing the postpartum blues.


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